Home Improvement Loan Interest Rate

You always have to check the programs that are available for you if you are canvassing for home improvement loan interest rate that can give you what you need.

In order to finance your home improvements, you need to file for loans that insures the lender that you can pay for whatever you owe in due time of what you have agreed on.

You also have to present your credit history. It is advised that you have impeccable credit standing in order for the lender to easily approve the loan that you want to make and also provide you with the home improvement loan interest rate that is appropriate for you.

Remember that the home improvement loans are not really government loans or grants.

The low interest rate regulates the interest so you can make the most out of this. The least you can do is to pay your mortgage on time so that these wouldn’t pile up.

If it did, then you would have a harder time paying it. The mortgage that you were supposed to be responsible for can eventually turn to foreclosure and this will mean losing your home. No home owner would want that to happen.

Home improvement loan interest rate may be used to finance the permanent home and to also make improvements which protect or also improves the livability and utility of the properties.

It includes the manufacturing of homes for single families or a number of families. Make sure that the plan that you signed up for will give you the most out of your money. After all, that is still your blood, sweat, and tears.

The interest rate is fixed and is usually based on the market rate of the area during the time the loan was made.

If it is negotiable, it varies between the lenders so the way for you to know which home improvement loan interest rate to go for is the one that is the best for you.

You can determine this is the rate that is given to you is an amount that you can afford and when calculated can give you ten times the price of your house when you bought it.

You can actually make a profit from it if you do plan to return it to the market.

The best part about the home improvement loan interest rate is that there is no prepayment penalty. However, you still have to pay your mortgage on the day that you should.

Understanding and Unleashing the Transformative Powers of Education (Learning How to Learn)

As a child, my parents always impressed upon me the importance of getting a good education. My father in particular, always told my siblings and I that we should strive to be number one in our studies. Because of the strict nature of my father, getting good grades was the rule, while getting low grades resulted in punishment. Needless to say, my siblings and I achieved honor role status throughout our K through middle school years. However, as I hit high school things began to change for me. I was no longer that little boy that followed my father’s every wish out of fear. By now, I had been hardened by the tough streets of Brooklyn and questioned whether getting a good (formal) education could take me out of this environment.

You see, in my community, I knew of few high school graduates, much less college graduates. My parents had limited education and struggled to provide for my siblings and I. Like many that grew up in poor communities, I experienced my fair share of pain and struggles. Like many of today’s youth that are dropping out of high school in record numbers, I too doubted the transformative powers of formal education touted by my parents and teachers. I did not believe that formal education alone could transform my socio-economic situation. As a result, I began to devalue formal education and withdrew (cutting classes regularly). Luckily, I began to realize the error in my thinking brought about by the intervention of a high school guidance counselor. I struggled to graduate high school, needing to attend summer school two years in a row in addition to night school. Nevertheless, I did graduate-But what next!?

Today, we hear news reports about the high dropout rates for inner city high school kids across America. I believe that this high dropout rate stems from the inability of the youth to understand and witness the transformative power of education within their communities. As a 34 year old man with a PhD, I can now attest to the transformative powers of getting a good education, but not just one that is formal. I have seen examples of education’s transformative powers in the lives of my colleagues, as well as in my own life. However, most people wont get a PhD, or even a college degree. Does this mean that they are doomed to a life of suffering and pain because of their socio-economic situation? Well not necessarily, as a significant percentage of millionaires in America did not graduate from college.

Still, statistics do show that one’s level of formal education directly correlates to one’s income (the higher the degree, the higher the income) and employability (the higher the degree, the higher the level of employability). So, it is safe to say that formal education does have transformative power in regards to one’s socio-economic situation. But, is simply graduating from high school and getting a college degree the answer to unlocking education’s transformative powers?

Let us take a look at the essence of education. Education is all about learning basic skills such as reading, writing, and mathematics, and then building on these skills with more complex fields of study such as science, history, and economics. What you are doing as you master and broaden your intellectual skills is teaching your brain how to learn.

What ways do I learn best?
What topics interest me most?
What topics do I find easiest to learn?
What topics will help me transform my life?
What topics will help me realize my life’s vision?

These are questions that you should be asking yourself as you learn how to learn (education). The truth is that formal education is beneficial to a point, but after that point it is not necessary for everyone. The reason for this is that once you learn the basics as previously described, you can take the initiative to go to libraries, museums, art galleries, plays, as well as surf the Internet to learn about anything you deem useful. Many successful people such as former President Abraham Lincoln were self-taught. But do keep in mind that because many of us do not have the discipline or desire to learn just for the sake of learning, K-12, trade schools, colleges, and universities put together formal curriculums designed to legitimize our educational experiences with a diploma, certificate of completion, or degree. The degree in particular, became popular with American employers in the 1960s, as America moved out of the Industrial Age to the Information Age. Prior to this shift, one could graduate high school and get a good middle class job at the same factory your father worked in. However, as industrial jobs disappear by the thousands because of outsourcing and globalization, a college degree has become essential for anyone looking to ascend in today’s new work world (the corporate world).

But, is the opportunity to transform one’s socio-economic situation utilizing formal education truly available to all? While formal education (K-12) is now available to all in America, getting a good formal education still comes at a premium. For example, inner city (K-12) public schools have historically underperformed when compared to their suburban public or private school counterparts. Therefore, socio-economics seems to be a factor in who has access to quality formal education. Another example of this is in the higher education arena, where the cost of attending a four-year institution is outpacing inflation, making attending college a dream for some and a burden for others finding it difficult to repay huge student loans after they graduate. What is someone who wants to transform his/her life utilizing formal education to do?

Well first, one has to assess his/her future goals.

What are you interested in doing with your life?

Reach out to guidance counselors, teachers/faculty in your schools. Maybe they can find outside educational programs that you can participate in that will increase your learning if your school is not providing you with enough rigor.

Seek out educational programs within as well as outside of your community.

Ask yourself questions such as-Do I need to go to an expensive college and be burdened with huge student loans when I graduate in order to achieve my goals?

Or could I attend a less expensive school and learn how to learn what I need to know to get where I want to go?

Parents, participate in your child’s education. Get involved with the faculty and other parents.

Keep abreast of political matters and then vote in the best interest of your child. And of greatest importance, seek out and provide examples of the transformative powers of education for your child. Be sure that they understand that the essence of education is not about getting a prestigious diploma or degree and saying “now pay me” to some employer.

The essence of education is about learning how to learn so that you can learn what you deem necessary for transforming your life.

Dropping out of high school does not help your cause.

Going to a prestigious school just to be burdened with huge student loan debt that you will have difficulty repaying does not help your cause.

Obtaining a particular degree that is not in alignment with your life’s vision, simply because it is easier to acquire then the degree you really need does not help your cause.

There is no doubt that education (learning how to learn) has transformative power, but in order to unleash that transformative power one has to understand the essence of education and then use it strategically.

The Fine and Performing Arts & Education

I see too many public service commercials-today-exhorting us to support the Performing and Fine Arts in public education. We, as a nation, have evidently become so low-brow, or unsophisticated, that we can no longer see the need for Art education in our schools. So now, we have our children pleading with us, on television commercials, to keep Art education alive. This is a sad state of affairs for us and our children, because art is what truly separates us from the beasts and allows us to rise above the mundane drudgery of life. As many others, I believe art should be at the center of education and not just because it’s good for us. Art stimulates a child’s cognitive and affective domains, as well as their motor skills, which leads to learning, discovery, creativity and motivation.

Academics are very important, of course, but too often they only stimulate a very small portion of the student’s mind and heart. There are three, basic domains of learning: the Cognitive (mind), Affective (emotions or feelings) and Motor-Skills (hands-on). These three domains are key to our thinking/reasoning, learning, problem solving and creating. A healthy mind (Cognitive) is capable of taking in, retaining and processing information, which can then be applied, if retained and used, to the individual’s life. Emotions and feelings (Affective) are closely connected to an individual’s learning, because they aid in retaining and applying information, as well as stimulating the desire to learn more. Seeing, hearing, speaking, the ability to write, walk and run are all part of the individual’s Motor-skills. Without these three domains, learning, needless to say, would be impossible. Reading, writing, math and the sciences stimulate the cognitive and motor skills domains quite effectively, but the affective is too often short changed.

If we think back to our school days, then we should be able to remember that the memorization of facts and successfully spitting them back out on tests was our main concern as students. This is very much a part of the learning process, and I’m not denying that, but where does the Affective domain play a significant part in this teaching process? In much of this way of learning the affective is absent, and-therefore-much of the educational material, which has just been learned, has no real application in the individual’s life and is forgotten. I remember very little about higher level math, the periodic table and scientific jargon. Why is that? It didn’t relate to my life nor touch me in a deep way. This is not to say that I, or anyone else, shouldn’t have taken math and science classes, but what I am saying is academics are less effective than they can be, because they tend to ignore the Affective domain.

I contend that the Arts use all three domains effectively, and they can-therefore-stimulate the student to apply, as well as retain, what they’ve learned. Creativity is key in this process. The Performing and Fine Arts have a distinct advantage-educationally-in their ability to allow students to create as they learn. In painting, students are in the process of creating at the same time they’re mixing colors and learning brush techniques. The same applies to sculpting and photography students. Many middle and high school music directors are-now-using computer programs to stimulate their students to compose as they learn to play and sing. Dance and theatre programs are examples, as well, of applying skills as their students learn. This artistic, educational process employs the cognitive and motor skills domains, but it also stimulates the affective. The art student experiences the sense of joy and satisfaction that comes from successfully learning, and then being able to immediately apply this knowledge in a very personal way. The Arts can enhance a student’s ability to express their emotions in a very positive way. These students have ownership of what they have learned and are able to express this ownership through creativity. The Performing or Fine Arts student is motivated-educationally-beyond just memorizing facts and passing tests, because they’re using their newly-acquired knowledge to express what lies deep in their heart and mind.

Surprisingly, the arts and sports have much in common, educationally. The basketball or football player, as well as the long-distant runner, learn their skills while applying them. The learning of physical techniques and immediate application reinforces the athlete’s desire to learn and perform even more. In team sports, such as football, baseball and basketball, the student athlete learns to work with others to produce a product, or team. The young athlete learns that the whole, or team, is greater than the sum of its parts, or players, as do dancers, actors, singers and instrumentalists. As in performing ensembles, these young athletes experience the joy that comes from accomplishing something special with others. They learn, in a very intimate way, responsibility towards others and that the team is dependent on the very weakest athlete, as well as the strongest and most gifted. There’s really very little difference between a football player and a band member, when it comes to being responsible and understanding that it takes everyone-involved-to be successful. This is such a valuable and wonderful lesson, and it is learned primarily, through the affective domain.

Educational collaboration between artistic disciplines is a great way for young artists to learn while they create. The pairing of young instrumentalists with dancers and visual artists, or actors with singers, can open up a whole new world of artistic exploration, discovery and creativity. These collaborations can become a great vehicle for learning and motivation, as any arts teacher who has experienced this process will testify. The educational process becomes more important than the outcome, or testing results, because it is in the process of exploration, discovery and creativity where learning really occurs. The educational outcome is secondary, because it is only used, in this case, to measure curricular goals. The motivation for and enjoying of learning comes through the process of collaboration, exploration, discovery and creating.

In academia, the emphasis-today-is placed more on the outcome, or testing and grades, which, in my estimation, is a huge mistake. Academic instructors could learn much from their counterparts in the arts. The government and its politically motivated, educational policies, of course, stands in the way of any successful, corrective change to academic teaching methods. Political agendas, such as, “No child left behind” are meaningless and worthless to students and teachers, because they’re not concerned, as they so hypocritically claim, with the success of the individual learner. Instead, these agendas are merely an attempt to soothe the fevered brows of unsatisfied constituents.

I will agree with academic teachers that their process seems to be more set in stone than with the arts, and the only real way they can measure educational outcomes is through testing. There has to be a way-however-to allow a math, science, English or history student to become more involved in the process of learning. English teachers have a distinct advantage, since they could use writing essays and poems to instill a sense of ownership in their students. Their students-then-could use their essays and poems to collaborate with young composers, actors and dancers, as an example. Even though it would be difficult, science, language and math teachers could also seek these same avenues for educational exploration, discovery and creativity, which would-then-hopefully-lead to a student’s retention/application, ownership and motivation. This, of course, will be impossible, as long as we allow our government to force academic teachers to teach-solely-towards the outcome, or “standardized” testing.

Why is the Shift Toward Online Education Happening?

This paper deals with the question: Why is the shift toward online education happening? This is a complex issue that involves questions of educational access, paradigms for teaching and learning, competition and globalization among universities, the development of new and better online technologies, and the financial pressures facing higher education. A huge transition is underway.

The same networking and computing technology that has revolutionized global commerce, and many other facets of modern life, is now being targeted at education. Partnering the Internet with modern course management systems makes it possible for universities to offer online coursework on a global basis. The critical task that lies ahead is to create and disseminate curricula of high quality that students can embrace and educators can sustain. For more details visit to [http://www.guardadsense.com]. The overall objective of José’s Online Education Forum is to examine the realities of college and university online teaching, and the processes of education using today’s information technologies. Collectively, the authors of this paper have taught over a hundred different university-level courses online, both graduate and undergraduate, mostly using the Internet. The issues and insights discussed in this Forum will provide educators with important tools and the understanding needed to effectively embrace the world of online education.

1. INTRODUCTION

1.1 The Sloan Consortium

In a Sloan-C survey of 1170 Provosts and Academic VPs, more than half indicated a belief that online education would be ‘critical for the long-term’ in higher education. Surprisingly perhaps, the same percentage said that they believe success in achieving learning outcomes is already equivalent between online and traditional teaching methods. And there was also a consensus of opinion among these respondents that the quality of online courses would continue to improve, with a third of them believing that online teaching quality will soon surpass the quality typical of conventional teaching. These opinions may be surprising for many of us in the teaching profession, coming as they do from such high level and influential administrators. They signal a fundamental change in perceptions about the potential of online education in the immediate future.

1.2 Overview

The objective in this paper is to investigate and assess why this shift to online education is happening. Several factors can be cited beginning with improvements in access to educational services using online technologies and changing paradigms for teaching and learning that integrate well with these technologies. Other factors include heightened educational competition and globalization, the ongoing and often dramatic improvements in online systems capabilities, and the underlying economics of providing online education versus conventional means. The following sections of this paper explore each of these factors individually.

2. ACCESS TO EDUCATION

2.1 Access for the Masses

The ability to use information technologies effectively is one aspect of achieving success in today’s society, both for individuals and for organizations as a whole. The current job market requires educated workers who are capable of changing and adapting as business and cultural realities shift and evolve in today’s fast-paced, global economy (Kantar, 2001). Information technology is enabling the development of this kind of economic world structure. For more information logon to [http://www.instant-adsense-dollars.com]. It is also making possible the education of the workforce that this new economy requires by providing new capabilities for teaching and learning online.

Online education offers the promise of increased access to high quality education for the masses. Exactly how this is going to occur is not clear yet, but there is no doubt that online education is rapidly becoming an established modality. The development of the modern world economy demands an educated workforce. Places like the three It’s (India, Indonesia, and Ireland) and more recently China, are finding that the need for an educated workforce is overwhelming the capabilities of their traditional educational systems. In America and Western Europe, the same economic and political pressures associated with ‘equality of opportunity’ contribute to demands for equal access to a quality education for all who seek it.

Affordable Education Abroad

Nigeria is a country with about one hundred and forty million inhabitants: a fast growing country with a near-vibrant economy. The Country over the years has been bedeviled by corruption. The social fabric has been in deplorable condition, leading to unfanciful placements in the world index standards.

Education is vital in human existence; it is a tool which helps government, private sector and informal units. For Nigeria as a country to forge ahead we need qualitative and substantive education. Over the years the educational system has been in disorder and the future of our children is in peril. The efforts of our founding fathers to make Nigerian Universities and Polytechnics solid seem to have gone down the drain.

The latest ranking of World Universities, places the first University in Nigeria- University of Ife, a distant six thousand three hundred and thirty four (6,334).Succor seems to have been found in foreign education. Countries like: U.S, UK, Australia, Canada, Singapore, Finland, Japan, etc have good educational system. Acquiring education outside the country is expensive per se. Average tuition fees (Bsc) of some selected countries (excluding living expenses) for undergraduate are: U.S $8,000, UK 6,000 pounds, Singapore $4,000, Malta $20,000, Malaysia $1,000, Ireland 6,000 euro, Norway-free, Sweden-free, Germany-free, Denmark-free, Finland-free, etc. These fees when converted to Naira is: Malaysia N130,000,UK N1,400,000,US N1,040,000,Malta N2,600,000,etc.

Free education- in all levels, is available in some countries in Europe-Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark and Germany. In Sweden, all levels of education are free. The Swedish system includes not only traditional universities but also different kinds of Teacher Training, Health Care Training, Technical Training; etc.Education funding is the responsibility of: the Central government, regional authorities and private interests. All institutions of higher education fall under the jurisdiction of the Ministry of Education except the University Sciences (Ministry of Agriculture).Higher education is divided into undergraduate studies (combined towards a first degree) and postgraduate studies and research. Sweden has 39 accredited institutions of Higher education that offer structured degree programmes.English language is a mode of study at some universities. Foreign students are allowed to work and study. Sweden has a boisterous economy with a very high per-capita income. Nigerian students should take this opportunity to study in Sweden.

In Finland all institutions of higher education are subject to the authority of the Ministry of Education, Research and Church Affairs. Higher Education in Norway is mainly offered at state institutions: Universities, University colleges, state colleges and art Colleges. Bachelors degree is completed after 3yrs of study, Master’s degree is completed after 2yrs duration, and PhD is after 3 years duration. Education is free at all levels in Finland. Foreign students can study in English since some Universities and colleges offer their courses in English Language. Students can work and study in Finland. There is no specific minimum wage, because there is no legislation on it.

In Malaysia there are four kinds of institutions offering higher education, namely: local public University, international Universities, Private Universities, and over 500 Public Higher Educational Institutions(PHEIS).The Systematic Education Group of Colleges operates eight Private Higher Educational Institutions(PHEIS). Systematic’s prime objective is to provide training to school leavers for their future career in Accounting ,Business, Computing, Marketing, management, Banking, secretarial and Commerce and industry. Systematic has produced world-class students in professional courses such as LCCI, ACCA, CIMA, ICSA, CIMA, ABE and CIM. A good reason why international students should study in Malaysia is that the holders of student pass or permit are allowed to work while studying to supplement their living. Students are allowed to work part-time for a maximum of 20 hours per week. Students have options to work in: local companies, multinational companies and embassies. Getting jobs in the multinational companies will depend on your prior qualifications and the salary range from $1,500-$2,500 per month. Students getting jobs in a local company is easy: the salary is from $800-$1,500.Accomodation is from $65/month-$150.The country is so affordable to live in. Lots of Nigerians are already in Malaysia studying for different programmes.

Singapore has an Educational system similar to that of the UK. At Tertiary level it has three Universities and 7 other institutions affiliated to both local and foreign Universities, and 4 polytechnics. The full-time enrollment of the Universities is about 40,000, of which 20,000 are female. Tuition fees of international students are generally 10% more than that for Singapore students. Tuition depends on the discipline you offer.Specialised disciplines like medicine and dentistry costs more than that of science, humanities, and law. Medicine goes for between $8,500 and $10,000/session: humanities, law, social science etc go for between $2,500-6000 for bachelor’s degree. The tuition fee for the 4-year Polytechnic is between $1,350-2,500. Singapore government highly subsidizes its higher education through the tuition grant. The tuition fee Loan Scheme helps pay 75%-80% of tuition fees, which makes higher education accessible to almost everyone. If after graduation you can’t afford to pay your loan, you will have to work an extra year or two to enable you pay the balance. The economy of Singapore is so boisterous. It is placed 20th in the table of the richest countries with a per capita income of $24,500/year Living in Singapore is inexpensive compared to income earned; and it seems higher education in Singapore is affordable to all able students.

Scholarships helps students who want to study abroad actualize it with less financial burden. Some examples are: British council fellowship programmes, Commonwealth Scholarship and fellowship plan, Commonwealth science council, UNESCO, Ford Foundation, African Education Trust, The Rotary Foundation Ambassadorial scholarship etc. British Chevening Scholarships -is funded by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (the British Ministry of Foreign Affairs).They give out scholarships every year in over 150 countries world-wide. This scholarship scheme provides fully funded Master’s Degree programmes to talented graduates and young Nigeria.Chevening has since inception produced over 800 Nigerian scholars. This figure puts the country first in Sub-Saharan Africa. British Council Fellowship Programmes- nationals of about 70 countries are eligible for full study at postgraduate level through the British council fellowship scheme, which is administered through its offices overseas. The scheme is advertised through the British Council in countries in which it operates. Details are available from British Council Offices. Ford Foundation-the international Fellowships programme (IFP) provides support for up to three years of formal graduate level study. Fellows must be nationals from Nigeria, Senegal, Ghana, Chile, Peru, Russia, and Vietnam.

Overseas certificates are rated very high in the country. Most people when they come back to the country with their certificates always get higher positions. A friend of mine who works in a bank went to UK for his MBA.He spent one year in UK before coming back. When he came back his bank promoted him and not up to two weeks after, he got another job (paying twice his salary in his former office)

Special Education Certificate of Attendance – Does it End Special Education Services?

Do you have a 17 or 18 year old with a disability receiving special education services? Have you been told that your 17 or 18 year old with autism or a learning disability, will be given a certificate of attendance? Have you also been told that your child will no longer be eligible for special education services, if they receive a certificate of attendance? This article will discuss a new tactic by some special education personnel to convince parents that their child is no longer eligible for special education. The tactic is certificates of attendance and will be discussed.

Several months ago I heard from a parent in Pennsylvania that had this tactic used on her. She contacted me and asked me what I thought about this issue.

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) states the following: The obligation to make a free appropriate public education (FAPE) available to all children with disabilities does not apply with respect to the following: Children with disabilities who have graduated from high school with a regular high school diploma.

The truth is that a Certificate of Attendance does not make a child ineligible for special education services. IDEA also states that children with disabilities have the right to be educated from the age of 3 years to 21 years. As long as the child does not accept a regular education diploma, they are eligible to receive special education services.

Another thing that parents must keep in mind is the importance of functional skills as well as academic skills. When IDEA was reauthorized in 2004 Congress added a section about functional skills. A child’s IEP must now include present levels of academic achievement and functional performance. Make sure that your school district is testing your child in the area of functional performance.

For children over 13 years of age I recommend the Scale of Independent Behavior. It is performed by parent survey, which means that the parent answers questions about what their child can do and cannot do. This scale covers: activities of daily living, communication, functional skills, job skills etc. Awesome measure of a young persons functional ability.

Also the purpose of IDEA is to: prepare children with disabilities for further education, employment, and independent living. If a child who is 17 or 18 years old and is not ready for post school learning, a job, or independent living they may need additional years of education. Parents often overlook functional skills when advocating for their child’s education.

If your school district tries to tell you that a Certificate of Attendance ends your child’s right to further special education services, consider filing a complaint with your state board of education. In my experience the more parents stand up to special education personnel who are not truthful the less they try and get away with. Do not let your child’s life be ruined by deceptions from some special education personnel. Good Luck-keep up the fight!